Officials’ use of private devices to conduct public business: A serious threat to open government

“BYOD,” or “Bring Your Own Device,” is an increasingly common corporate practice in which employees are permitted to conduct business on their personal computing devices. In the private sector, the practice is believed to increase productivity, enhance employee morale, and save on costs. In the public sector, the same practice threatens the ability of citizens…

Bensenhaver’s work recognized

Today, the State Journal recognized Amye Bensenhaver’s work on government transparency. In an editorial article, the Journal commended the director of the Center for Open Government on her proposals for “much-needed modernization and strengthening of sunshine laws.” Praising Bensenhaver, the State Journal affirmed her credibility: “No one in Kentucky is more thoroughly versed on the…

UofL Foundation audit exposes willful obstruction of open records act

Shocking revelations abound in the forensic audit of the University of Louisville Foundation, but none more shocking to proponents of open government than the revelation that the foundation conspired with its attorneys to conceal and destroy records that exposed financial abuses, brazenly documenting these activities in an electronic “paper trail.” The audit describes a lack…

What education accountability can (and cannot) do, Part II

Once again, Prof. Gary Houchens, a Bluegrass Institute Scholar and Kentucky Board of Education member as well as a professor at Western Kentucky University, has posted a great blog about the goals and limitations of education accountability. I highly recommend reading Dr. Houchens’ blog. By the way, at the risk of oversimplification, an education accountability…

Mississippi fires testing contractor who made serious mistakes

Kentucky uses same contractor AP reports that Mississippi has fired NCS Pearson after that testing company made serious grading errors on high school tests that have impacted graduation for as many as 1,000 students. Some students who actually performed poorly on a high school history test erroneously got high scores while other students who actually…

Ambiguity allows officials to use tech toys, dodge sunshine laws

Bluegrass Institute Center for Open Government Director Amye Bensenhaver and President and CEO Jim Waters joined Kruser and Krew on Lexington’s NewsTalk 590 WVLK-AM  this week for a segment on Bensenhaver’s report. Sunshine laws, Bensenhaver told the afternoon radio audience, are laws that “guarantee the public’s right of access to open records…and open meetings.” The state…